Thursday, March 26, 2015

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT

Today I am bringing home a guest post I shared over at Sew McCool.  I love simple projects that I can use year after year.  The Petal Hat is one of those great patterns that can be used for several years from baby to toddler.


Spring is here! I like to protect my baby's head while we play outside, go to the park and get ready for our summer activities.  

Meet the Petal Hat!

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT

Last summer, I designed this cute hat for my baby girl.  I wanted to make one for this year.  I have seen similar hats in some larger sizes but not something for tiny baby heads.  

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT

I thought, if I am going to make one for my baby girl, why not share the fun and provide the pattern for all of you!  

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT

The pattern comes in 3 sizes Small (3 months to 6 months), Medium (6 months to 12 months), and Large (12 months to 24 months).

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT

Okay, are you ready to start sewing???

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT

Materials Need: 
2 fat quarters  (I like contrasting fabrics, but you can do whatever)
Thread
Petal Hat Pattern Pieces (sizes 3 month to 24 month)

Step 1
Cut out your pieces.  You'll need 5 petals of your main fabric, 5 of the lining and 2 for the ties.
Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT

Step 2
Place 2 petals right sides together, matching side seams.  Using a 1/4" seam allowance, stitch from the point at the top down to the end of the side seam and make sure to backstitch.  

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT

Add the next petal with right sides together and stitch down the side seam. Repeat with remaining petals until all 5 are sewn together.

Repeat step 2 with lining pieces.  Set aside your main hat and lining hat. 

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT
Step 3
With right sides together, fold one of your ties in half vertically.  Stitch across one of the short edges and down the long edge.  Clip your corner.  Repeat with the other tie.


Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT

Carefully turn your ties right side out using a turning device such as a wooden dowel or the eraser side of a pencil.

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT
  Step 4
 Take your hat lining and place it wrong side out.  Pin your ties directly across from each other on the hat.  

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT
Turn your main hat right side out, place it inside the lining.  Match up all the petals and pin in place.  Make sure you mark a spot for a 2" opening in the middle of one of your petals.  This will be used to turn the hat right side out.

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT
Step 5
Stitch around the petals of your hat at 1/4", leaving one of your petals open.  As you stitch, make sure to carefully follow the curve of the hat.  When you get the a seam, make sure to put your needle down and turn your hat so that your petals have a nice shape and look separate when you turn it right side out.  

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT
Step 6
Clip along each of your petals every 1-2".  Clip into each of your seams.  This allows the petals to lay flat and curved when turned.


Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT
Step 7
 Carefully pull your hat right side out through the opening you left on one of your petals.  Press your hat around each petal and seam.  Making sure all the rounded edges and corners are flat and smooth.

When you get to your open petal, press the raw edges inside the hat so that they don't show.

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT

 Step 8 
Topstitch your main fabric and lining together at 1/8" by following curve of each petal.  Make sure that your topstitching closes your open petal.

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT
Congratulations, now you are done.  Go find that cute model of yours and try it on her.

Reversible Petal Hat Tutorial by GYCT

Thanks for checking out my tutorial.

Monday, March 23, 2015

Seam Finishes 101

Seam Finishes 101 by GYCT Designs

Have you ever wondered what a pattern meant when it said something like "finish the seams"  or "use your favorite seam finish"?  Well, today I am bringing home a post I previously posted over at Sew McCool.  We call it Seam Finishes 101.  Hopefully we can help enlighten you and teach you a few things about seam finishes.

A Seam Finish is applied to the outside edge of the seam allowance.  It can be cut, covered or sewn to prevent the seam allowance from fraying.  We often think of seam finishes as being used on woven fabrics because they fray easily.  However, seam finishes can also be applied to knit fabrics.  Seam finishes aren't just for preventing fraying, they also add a professional look to any finished garment.  Some seam finishes can be applied during the sewing process, others can be applied at the end of the process.  It just depends on what type of finish you use.

Today we are going to focus on some of the most basic seam finishes used on woven fabrics.  There are 5 that any sewist should know:

Pinked
Pinked and Stitched
Clean Finished or Turned and Stitched
Zig-Zag 
French Seam
Seam Finishes 101 by GYCT Designs

 The first step to completing a seam finish is to find your seam allowance.  All sewn garments have a seam allowance.  Adult garments usually have a 5/8" seam allowance and children's garments a 3/8" seam allowance. 
Seam Finishes 101 by GYCT Designs
Stitch the seam allowance then press the seam flat.  Then open the seam allowance like shown above and press it open.  Pressing sets the stitching into the garment.  Pressing open makes all your seams flat and gives a very professional look.  Now let's learn some seam finishes.


Seam Finish #1:  Pinked
To make a Pinked Seam Finish you'll need your pinking shears (affiliate).  Pinking shears are the scissors with the teeth.  Pinking the edges of your seam allowance will help stop a woven fabric from fraying.  Simply use your pinking shears to cut down each seam allowance.  Make sure not to cut to close to the seam so you don't end up making a hole in your garment.

When to use Pinking:  This is a great seam finish to use on cotton quilting fabrics.  I often will use my pinking shears to cut out my pattern.  That way my seam allowance is already in place.  Cuts back on a simple step.  Pinking is also great when cutting out denim fabric that tends to fray a lot during the sewing process.


Seam Finishes 101 by GYCT Designs

Seam Finish #2:  Pinked and Stitched
Once again you will use your pinking shears.  You'll cut along the edge of the seam allowance.  Then simple open one of your seam allowances and sew a straight line next to your pinked edge.  Repeat on the opposite side.  Make sure not to sew the seam allowance to your garment.

When to use Pinked and Stitched:  Pinked and Stitched seam finishes are great for fabrics that unravel easily.  Or for really bulky fabrics.  For example, you may use your pinking shears to cut out your project.  When you come to finishing the seam, you can add a straight stitch to ensure the fabric doesn't unravel further.



Seam Finishes 101 by GYCT Designs

Seam Finish #3:  Clean Finish
A Clean Finish seam finish is also known as a Turned and Stitched or even a Single Fold.  Press your seams flat and open.  Then fold one side of your seam allowance towards the seam and press.  Repeat with the opposite side.


Seam Finishes 101 by GYCT Designs

Next, stitch down the folded seam allowance on both sides.  This will hide the raw edge of the seam allowance and makes a very finished professional look.

When to use the Clean Finish: this is a great finish for light to medium weight fabrics.  I love to use this finish when I am making tops from woven fabrics.  Gives them a nice finish and keeps the seams from fraying too much.


Seam Finishes 101 by GYCT Designs


 Seam Finish #4:  Zig-Zag 
A Zig-Zag finish is probably one of my favorites.  This is the first seam finish my students ever learn.  It is fast, functional and user friendly.  Anyone can make a zig-zag stitch.  Simply stitch your machine stitch to a zig-zag and stitch down the seam allowance.  You can stitch each side separately or your can stitch the two seams together.  Totally up to you.  You can also use whatever zig-zag you'd like and whatever stitch length.  It is always smart to test the zig-zag on a scrap piece of fabric to see what size works best.

When to use a Zig-Zag Seam Finish:  A zig-zag can be used on most fabrics.  However, it is best used on those that don't fray to much or snag.



Seam Finishes 101 by GYCT Designs

Seam Finish #5:  French Seam

The French Seam is one of the prettiest seam finishes you can make.  Place the fabric pieces with wrong sides together and stitch your seam allowance.  Then press if flat and open.  Next, fold the fabrics with right sides together and stitch down.

One important thing to remember about the French Seam is that it will change your seam allowance.  So if you are suppose to sew a 5/8" seam you either need to add to the seam allowance when cutting out or stitch a smaller seam allowance to start with.  For instance, below I stitch a 1/4" seam allowance when the fabrics were wrong sides together.  When I folded it with right sides together, I then stitched it at 3/8".  This gave me the 5/8" that I needed.


1/4" + 3/8"  =  5/8"
Seam Finishes 101 by GYCT Designs
When to use the French Seam:  this seam is best for fabrics that fray a lot such as silky fabrics, lightweight or gauze like fabrics.  However, you can use it on others as well.  I often use it on kids pillowcase.  It hides the raw edge and keeps it from fraying which is great when you are shoving a pillow in and out of a pillowcase often and wash often.


Seam Finishes 101 by GYCT Designs

I hope this little guide to seam finishes has helped you.  Seam finishes really do make the garment last longer through all the washings and wearings.  They also give a garment a much more professional look.  Find the one that works best for you and start sewing!


Seam Finishes 101 by GYCT Designs

Friday, March 20, 2015

Firecracker Sewalong Coming SOON!!!


Firecracker Sewalong Starts in just a couple of weeks!
Join our GYCT Facebook group so you don't miss out on the details AND to grab our store wide coupon code.

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial

Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial

I so love making holiday dresses for my little one.  Last Easter is when I first started working on the Holly and Ivy Party Dress.  The first draft was my daughters Easter dress.  Finally, today I want to share it with you.  All you need is either the Holly and Ivy Party Dress or your favorite dress pattern.

Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial
 Today's free tutorial is making the skirt to attach to your favorite bodice top.  This bodice top is the sweetheart neckline and the gathered puff sleeve from the Holly and Ivy Party Dress.  For the skirt, you'll just need the measurements given in your pattern.  

Materials Needed
Fabric for Ruffle Underskirt
Ruffles - I used eyelet 
Fabric for Overskirt
Thread

Step 1
Take the front layer of your underskirt.  Pin the bottom layer of ruffles across the skirt.  Stitch in place.  Continue until you have enough layers to cover the entire skirt fronts.

Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial

Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial


Step 2
With right sides together, place the back skirt over the front skirt.  Stitch down the side seams.  Hem the bottom of the skirt.
Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial


Step 3
For the overskirt, cut out one back piece as the rectangle.  For the front you'll want to cut 2 front pieces.  Cut a rounded edge from the top to the hem on both pieces.  Enough that will allow the two pieces to overlap slightly.



Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial

Step 4
Sew the front pieces to the back piece.  Hem the skirt by folding up 1/4" and then another 1/2".
Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial

Step 5
Place the front skirt around the underskirt and pin around the top.  Stitch two rows of gathering stitches through the two skirts.  

Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial

Step 6
Place the finished bodice top and skirt next to one another.  Pull the gathering stitches until the skirt is the same width as the bodice.

Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial

Step 7
Turn the bodice wrong side out and match the top of the skirt to the raw edge of the bodice.  Stitch the bodice to the skirt.

Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial

TADA!!  You are done.  Simple addition to your Holly and Ivy Party Dress.  A fun twist to the dress but still very classic.


Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial

My Little Miss sure loved it.  And we got so many compliments.  

Holly & Ivy Crossover Skirt and Ruffle Petticoat Tutorial

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Sewing 101: Sewing Machine Anatomy

Sewing 101:  Sewing Machine Anatomy



If you are at all like me and you L-O-V-E your sewing machine, than you know how important it is to know how to use your machine properly.  Today we want to teach you each a little Sewing Machine Anatomy for our Sewing 101 Series.  

No I will admit that all sewing machines are not created equally.  That being said, it doesn't matter whether you learn to sew on a cheap machine or the most expensive machine in the world.  Honestly, sewing machines may not all have the same bells and whistles, but they do have very similar features and some that are exactly the same.  If you ever wondered what I sew on, I will tell you.  Meet "Bernie" my Bernina 830.  She is an oldie but a goodie.  She really is a goodie.  My husband bought her for my probably 4 years ago for Christmas.  This is the exact model machine is Mother sewed on when he was growing up.  

So today, Bernie is going to assist me in teaching you a little sewing machine anatomy.  I tried to label each of the parts of the machine.  Now, your machine should still have all the key anatomy below, where it is located may not be in the same place.  However, a good place to start is to check out your sewing machine manual.

Sewing 101:  Sewing Machine Anatomy


Bobbin Winder:  Often located on the top or the side of the sewing machine, used to hold the empty bobbin to wind thread for use in the bobbin.
Button Hole Control: Used to create buttonholes.  Often on electronic machines, this feature is actual a button your push.
Feed Dogs:  These are the little teeth located under your presser foot.  They help to move the fabric through the machine as you sew.
Feed Dog Control:  This may be located on the outside, but sometimes it is located inside the bobbin compartment.  Why would you need this?  When you are sewing on a button or sometimes when tacking fabric, you'll want to drop your feed dogs so that your fabric doesn't move through your machine.


Sewing 101:  Sewing Machine Anatomy


Foot Pedal:  The foot pedal is just that, the pedal your foot pushes to operate the machine.  The more pressure you place on the foot pedal the faster your machine goes.
Hand Wheel:  The hand wheel is located on the right side of your sewing machine.  This is a great way to "walk" your needle.  Meaning, if you are at a corner or edge and don't want your threads to go to far, you move the hand wheel towards your body and your needle will continue to sew down and up.  ALWAYS move the hand wheel towards your body.
Machine Arm:  This is the part of the machine that "sticks out".  This is where your fabric will usually be hanging out most of the time while you sew.
Needle:  The needle is used to sew the thread into the fabric.  It is sharp enough to penetrate the fabric without damaging it.  For different types of fabrics, you'll want different sizes of needles.  We will cover this in another lesson.
Needle Position:  The needle position controls where the needle is sewing.  If you want to sew closer to the right side you can change the needle position and where your needle stitches.
On/Off Switch:  Turns your machine on and off.
Presser Foot:  The presser foot holds your fabric in place while you sew.  You lower the presser foot using the lever directly behind the presser foot.  Some machines also have an attachment that you can use to lower the presser foot using your knee.  Your machine probably has several different presser feet such as a zipper foot or walking foot.  We discuss those in another lesson. 
Spool Pins:  Located at the top of the machine, sometimes you open the machine to find them as well.  These hold your spools of thread.
Stitch Length:  This button is used to lengthen or shorten the length of your stitches.  Longer stitches are used for basting or gathering.  Short stitches are used on slick fabrics.
Tension:  This adjusts how tight the thread works through your machine.  You have several places to adjust tension.
Thread Guide:  This is where the thread is looped through the machine so it can work through the machine.
Throat Plate:  This is the cover that is over the feed dogs.  This can be removed for cleaning.


Sewing 101:  Sewing Machine Anatomy


Bobbin:  The thread is wound around the bobbin.
Bobbin Case:  Holds the bobbin to be placed in the machine.

And there you have it. Basic sewing machine anatomy.  Most machines will have the same features.  The more expensive and newer machines will have even more features, like the ability to embroider and fun stitch designs.  

Check out some of our other sewing machine posts:

  DIY Sewing Machine Cover with Piping by GYCT  How to Make Perfect Gathers from GYCT

Monday, March 16, 2015

Jean & Jamey Jammies and FREE Nightgown Pattern

Craftsy affiliate links are used in this post.



I am super excited today because not only is Monthly Monday Madness but we are also releasing our first ever Add-On pattern!  

Today you can grab the Jean and Jamey Jammies Pattern for only $4 in shop.  This is one of my favorite patterns because I can use it all year long.  The pattern has 2 sleeve lengths, shorts and pants with a cuff or without.  

Jean & Jamey Jammie Pattern Release by GYCT designs


The top has the option of having a flat front or a little gathered front.  Which is my favorite part to add just a little girly touch.

Jean & Jamey Jammie Pattern Release by GYCT designs

And now you can get the FREE Nightgown add-on pattern!!!  Just join our GYCT Designs Facebook group and get the Jean and Jamey Nightgown Add-On for free!!!!

Jean & Jamey Jammie Pattern Release by GYCT designs


The Nightgown comes in size 12 month to 12 years.  After testing, the length goes to below the knee and is great for summer or winter.  All you need is to grab the Jean & Jamey Jammies pattern for sleeves and directions and you are set to make the nightgown.

Jean & Jamey Jammie Pattern Release by GYCT designs


The nightgown comes with only the gathered color blocked front.  The back is solid.  It is such a comfy fit, I think I need one for myself.

Jean & Jamey Jammie Pattern Release by GYCT designs


For today only, grab the Jean and Jamey Jammies for only $4 in our GYCT Shop.  No code need, price already reduced at checkout.
Jean & Jamey Jammie Pattern Release by GYCT designsJean & Jamey Jammie Pattern Release by GYCT designsJean & Jamey Jammie Pattern Release by GYCT designs

You can also grab the Jean and Jamey's in our Etsy and Craftsy Shops.  Although it is only on sale in our GYCT Shop.